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Orthopaedic Technician Program

Program Overview

Does the thought of working alongside a team of medical professionals, helping patients recover from their injuries and working in a hospital or clinic environment excite you? If so, a career as an Orthopaedic Technician may be the right career for you.

As an Orthopaedic Technician, you will work directly with orthopaedic surgeons.  Orthopaedic technology involves the application and removal of casts, splints, and braces. You will also work with, and instruct patients in caring for their injuries.

The program at Westervelt College provides a balance of both theory and hands-on experience. During your clinical labs, you will learn how to cast and splint, gain an understanding of how to operate and adjust traction equipment, crutches, walkers, and other aides.  In the Patient Care course, you will learn how to provide instructions to patients.

Uniforms are included in the program fees. Financial assistance is available to students who qualify. For assistance, please contact our Admissions team for more information.

Program Courses

As part of the program, you will participate in three work placements to gain valuable hands-on experience. At the end of your program, you will participate in an eight-week work practicum. 

  • Anatomy & Physiology Fundamentals I & II

    This course will provide the Orthopaedic Technician student with an understanding of the body. The presentation of material will use selective information and chosen facts that stress essential concepts. Students will acquire the knowledge of anatomy and physiology as each body system is studied. Topics include Muscle Tissue and Muscle System, Musculoskeletal, Nervous, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic and Immune, other clinical oriented anatomy with emphasis placed on the applications related to their training as an Orthopaedic Technician. All of the above will be taught in a manner that introduces and reinforces proper anatomical and medical terminology necessary for professional practice.

    Anatomy & Physiology Fundamentals I - Lower Extremity

    This course will provide the Orthopaedic Technician student with an understanding of the body. The presentation of material will use selective information and chosen facts that stress essential concepts. Students will acquire the knowledge of anatomy and physiology as each body system is studied. Topics include Muscle Tissue and Muscle System, Musculoskeletal, Nervous, Cardiovascular, Lymphatic and Immune, other clinical oriented anatomy with emphasis placed on the applications related to their training as an Orthopaedic Technician. All of the above will be taught in a manner that introduces and reinforces proper anatomical and medical terminology necessary for professional practice.

  • Career Strategies

    Taught by our professionals in Graduate Employment Services, this course is designed to train students to research and how to obtain their desired career goals. Topics covered include: current employer expectations in the selection process, winning resume styles, interview skills and techniques, and successful strategies to develop and conduct their personal career search.

  • CPR & First Aid Training

    Upon completion of this course, students will be certified in CPR and First Aid Techniques. Some of the topics studied are: the history of the Red Cross, Airway Emergency Breathing and Circulation, Wound Care, as well as, Bone, Muscle, and Joint Injuries.

  • Equipment and Orthopaedic Appliances I & II

    In this fundamental course, students will learn how to successfully apply different forms of Orthopaedic softgoods and bracing pertaining to the upper extremity and the equipment utilized for successful application of braces. Areas of study include nomenclature, anatomy, tissue healing and the bracing function, including fabrication, equipment and materials brace application, along with substitute methods to bracing.

    Equipment and Orthopaedic Appliances II - Lower Extremity

    In this fundamental course, students will learn how to successfully apply different forms of Orthopaedic soft goods and braces pertaining to the lower extremity and the equipment utilized for successful application of soft goods and braces. Areas of study include nomenclature, anatomy, tissue healing and the bracing function, including fabrication, equipment and materials brace application, along with substitute methods to bracing.

  • Fractures, Treatment and Rehab I & II

    Fractures, Treatment and Rehab I - Fractures in Children Upper Extremity

    In this core course, students will study how fractures in children differ from fractures in adults. They will understand the anatomy, biomechanics, and physiology of a child’s skeleton and view the differences in fracture patterns, difficulties in diagnoses, and the various treatment methods associated with injuries. Some areas of study include: fractures in special circumstances, different bone fractures of the body, emergence fracture reduction, and accident prevention. This course will focus primarily on the upper extremity of a child’s musculoskeletal system.

    Fractures, Treatment and Rehab I - Fractures in Children Lower Extremity

    In this core course, students will study how fractures in children differ from fractures in adults. They will understand the anatomy, biomechanics, and physiology of a child’s skeleton and view the differences in fracture patterns, difficulties in diagnoses, and the various treatment methods associated with injuries. Some areas of study include, fractures in special circumstances, different bone fractures of the body, emergence fracture reduction, and accident prevention. This course will focus primarily on the lower extremity of a child’s musculoskeletal system.

  • Fundamentals of Orthopaedic I & II

    Fundamentals of Orthopaedic I - Upper Extremity

    Students will be exposed to didactic and clinical instruction necessary to care for orthopedic patients in acute and clinic settings. Introduction to the anatomical components and basic function of the Upper Extremity musculoskeletal and neurological systems for the orthopedic patient including complications related to bone healing, x-ray utilization, aseptic technique and fractures. Students will study Training in appropriate written and spoken medical terminology. The student will be introduced to the training requirements for the Canadian Society of Orthopaedic Technology.

    Fundamentals of Orthopaedic II - Lower Extremity

    Students will be exposed to didactic and clinical instruction necessary to care for orthopedic patients in acute and clinic settings. Introduction to the anatomical components and basic function of the Lower Extremity musculoskeletal and neurological systems for the orthopedic patient including complications related to bone healing, x-ray utilization, aseptic technique and fractures. Students will study Training in appropriate written and spoken medical terminology. The student will be introduced to the training requirements for the Canadian Society of Orthopaedic Technology.

  • Medical Terminology I & II

    Medical Terminology I

    This course provides basic medical terminology, including the basic medical acronyms, used in both Emergency Department Charting as well as Outpatient Fracture Clinic settings in relation to Orthopaedics with a focus on Upper Extremity structures of the human body.

    Medical Terminology II

    This course provides basic medical terminology, including the basic medical acronyms, used in both Emergency Department Charting as well as Outpatient Fracture Clinic settings in relation to Orthopaedics with a focus on Lower Extremity structures of the human body.

  • Muscles - Testing & Function

    This course explores the essentials of the basic sciences and clinical practices relating to the musculoskeletal tissues providing a comprehensive overview of the musculoskeletal system in both adults and children. Along with studying common disorders and injuries, students will examine muscle compartment syndromes, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), current chemotherapy and limb-salvage procedures for malignant musculoskeletal neoplasms, and effective devices for the internal fixation of fractures.

  • Musculoskeletal Assessment I & II

    Musculoskeletal Assessment I - Upper Extremity

    In this course, students learn the proper techniques to accurately assess joint range of motion and muscle strength. Students will understand the principles and methodologies of assessment methods and how they are applied in a healthcare clinical setting. Students will become well versed in various techniques of assessment of the upper extremities, head and neck.

    Musculoskeletal Assessment II - Lower Extremity

    In this course builds on the assessment tools and techniques learned in Orth420. Students continue to develop and apply the proper techniques to accurately assess joint range of motion and muscle strength. Students will understand the principles and methodologies of assessment methods and how they are applied in a healthcare clinical setting. Students will become well versed in various techniques of assessment of the lower extremities, trunk and hip.

  • Patient Care & Interpersonal Skills

    In this course, emphasis is placed on communicating with pharmacy personnel, other health care professionals, and customers. Students are encouraged to use effective listening skills when dealing with different or difficult people. Ethnic and cultural differences are celebrated and tolerance and understanding is applauded. Responding to and communicating with government officials, in the case of audits, is also covered as well as skills used when communicating to insurance companies, manufacturers or wholesalers. Confidentiality is also addressed in this course.

  • Radiology Interpretation I & II

    Radiology interpretation I – Upper Extremity

    This eyes-on portion of the course will provide the student the ability to read a basic x-ray of the upper extremities, neck and spine. It will also give the students a working knowledge of cross-sectional anatomy and imaging, including a review of basic CT and MRI studies that primary care physicians are likely to order for their patients and Orthopaedic Technicians in clinical settings will encounter. Basic radiologic science will be reviewed in addition to discussion of how to develop methodical approaches for reading basic x-ray images to lead to greater diagnostic accuracy.

    Radiology interpretation II – Lower Extremity

    This eyes-on portion of the course will provide the student the ability to read a basic x-ray of the lower extremities. It will also give the students a working knowledge of cross sectional anatomy and imaging, including a review of basic CT and MRI studies that primary care physicians are likely to order for their patients and Orthopaedic Technicians in clinical settings will encounter. Basic radiologic science will be reviewed in addition to discussion of how to develop methodical approaches for reading basic x-ray images to lead to greater diagnostic accuracy.

  • Splinting & Casting I & II

    Splinting & Casting I - Upper Extremity

    In this fundamental course, students will learn how to successfully fabricate different forms of splints and casts for the upper extremity. Areas of study include nomenclature, anatomy, tissue healing and the splint making process, including pattern fabrication, equipment and materials needed, along with substitute methods to splinting. Students acquire the techniques and skills essential to creating and applying casts and splints using various casting and splinting material. Students will develop the knowledge of casting and splinting for fracture management and functional casting and splinting.

    Splinting & Casting II - Lower Extremity

    In this fundamental course, students will learn how to successfully fabricate different forms of splints and casts for the lower extremity. Areas of study include nomenclature, anatomy, tissue healing and the splint making process, including pattern fabrication, equipment and materials needed, along with substitute methods to splinting.

  • Sterile & Wound Care Management

    This course explores the essentials of the basic sciences and clinical practices relating to wound care management. This course will provide a basic overview of wound care management using clean, sterile and aseptic technique. Students will learn the difference between the techniques as well as basic wound care for surgical incisions and pins sites as well as skin abrasions and cuts. Students will also gain knowledge in the medical terminology used to describe skin condition and peri wound skin appearance.

  • Principles of Traction Therapy

    This course explores the principles of traction therapy and balanced suspension in adults and paediatric patients. Students will learn the purpose of traction therapy as well as the anatomical considerations. Different types of traction therapy will be explored and explained. The application and nursing care of traction will be emphasized.

  • Practical Labs I, II & III

    In this section students will practice the theory and techniques they are developing in their respective courses. The lab portion of this program is taught in conjunction with individual courses and will be exercised throughout the program.

  • Clinical Placement

    This practical experience provides 3 different placement experiences. One 30-hour placement in semester one, One 60-hour placement in semester two, and a 240-hour placement in semester four. These placements provide the opportunity for students to integrate their studies with valuable work experience. The settings are variable such as: Hospital Clinics and Private Fracture Clinics. Successful achievement requires completion of the Orthopaedic Evaluation Passbook, inclusive of listed competencies, timesheets, evaluation by a representative from the host medical organization, and the Westervelt clinical instructor.

Admission Requirements

  • OSSD or equivalent successful completion of the qualifying entrance exam (available to mature students 18 years or older)
  • Government Issued Photo ID
  • Privacy of Personal Information (PIPEDA)
  • Grade 11 or Grade 12 English
  • Grade 11 or Grade 12 Biology, Chemistry OR Physics

Practicum Requirements

  • Proof of Criminal Record Check
  • Statement of Satisfactory Health Requirements

Program Details

Duration12 Months
Program TypeDiploma
Tuition
Tuition, Fees & Books $18,670.00